The King’s Speech (2010)

“Timing isn’t my strong suit.”

Cast: Colin Firth, Geoffrey Rush and Helena Bonham Carter

I don’t usually like movies set in older time periods, or about the Royals, I’m not keen on listening to the Queen’s English being spoken in films, I don’t particularly like the old-fashioned dress sense or the values kept back then, and I despise the boring and slow paced nature of these films.

They bring back memories of me being forced to watch weird VCR programmes in History class, and taking notes on something that happened ages ago, which I didn’t care much for (even if I probably should.) Films like this don’t really interest me. So given the option to watch a movie about one, or a combination of these things… Well I’d rather sit that one out.

The Kings Speech however was recommended to me by a family member, who said despite what I thought, I should give it a go. When I heard the title I didn’t think it would be one for me. Nevertheless, I sat down with an open mind and was pleasantly surprised by my reaction.

Colin Firth takes the lead of the film as Prince Albert Duke of York, who suffers from a terrible stammer. The opening scenes of the film position the audience in a very uncomfortable situation, with Albert’s attempt to deliver a speech at the closing 1925 Empire Exhibition. This immediately sets the tone of the film and establishes our willingness for him to succeed in his role as Prince and eventually King, as well as our unease when he falters.

Son of King George V, Albert was teased throughout his childhood and constantly criticised by his father, who has a very frustrated and tormenting manner toward him. Though determined to overcome his stammer, Albert believes he is incurable. That is until his wife, Elizabeth Duchess of York, played by the fantastic Helena Bonham Carter, finds a speech therapist that claims he can cure anybody.

This historical film is a heart-warming look at Prince Albert’s rise to the throne, his determination to overcome his main obstacle and in doing so, finding his voice. At times frustrating, others emotional, The Kings Speech is a well documented look at the rise of Prince Albert to King George VI, with the help of his speech therapist Lionel Logue.

The film gathered twelve Academy Awards nominations including Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actress, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Director at the Oscars 2011. Meaning it takes the lead of the nominations list.

Star Rating: 8/10

Directed by Tom Hooper.

Running time 118 minutes.

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